Even The Canadians Will Cave When Bush Demands It

Cass Lake, MNThe Canadian training manual used by diplomats in their Foreign Service have a section that lists all of the countries where torture is used. I’ll give you three guesses on which countries are on the list.

Give up?!?

United States, Israel, Afghanistan, China, Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Syria

Isn’t it nice to be in the company with the likes of Mexico and Egypt? Makes ya feel like you need a flea-dip, doesn’t it?

Al Jazeera is reporting the story that the Canadians caught a rash from the US Ambassador and demanded that the US be removed from the list.

“We find it to be offensive for us to be on the same list with countries like Iran and China. Quite frankly it’s absurd,” David Wilkins, the US Ambassador told The Associated Press on Friday.

“For us to be on a list like that is just ridiculous.”

He said the US does not authorise or condone torture. “We think it should be removed and we’ve made that request. We have voiced our opinion very forcefully,” Wilkins said.

Note to Mr. Wilkins:

The Bush Administration, after the United States Supreme Court told him he wasn’t allowed, decided to redefine what constituted “torture”. compromise TortureAnd if I’m not mistaken, it was Republican presidential candidate John McCain who decided to com- promise with the Bush Admin- istration by not only him to redefine what is and what is not “Torture”. But McCain’s “compromised” included “Sodomy” and “Rape” as methods Bush would be allowed and still not be considered torture. (Leave it to those dirty-minded Republicans. Honest to God…How many perverted little pigs can the Republican Party produce?! It’s fascinating that since they’re so pron to sexually deviant behavior (Larry Craig, David Vitter, Bob Allen, etc) that deciding “rape” and “sodomy” should be allowed for prisoners as a means of compromise really couldn’t be that big of a surprise, should it?) I wonder how many times John McCain was raped and sodomized when he was a POW?

The Canadian response was just as bad. The Canucks sounded a bit like a trapped rat:

“I regret the embarrassment caused by the public disclosure of the manual used in the department’s torture awareness training,” Bernier said.

It contains a list that wrongly includes some of our closest allies. I have directed that the manual be reviewed and rewritten. The manual is neither a policy document nor a statement of policy. As such, it does not convey the government’s views or positions,” the statement added.

All of this came about via a certain Syrian-born Canadian engineer, Maher Arar. Arar was detained and tortured for over a year in Syria by the United States. The Canadian justice working on his behalf, eventually cleared him of the allegations. That same justice inquiry produced a manual about the case which was used to develop and train future Canadian diplomats. The training manual explained what appropriate actions should be taken when they’re handing captives to these countries on the list and it eventually become the gold standard for the Canadian Foreign Service.

Amnesty International got the final word:

Alex Neve, secretary general of Amnesty International, said: “It was commendable to see that manual, which seemed to include an important section that was an objective assessment of humanFruitFly 6 rights concerns around the world.

“To see that now be undermined by concerns about embarrassing allies is very disappointing.”

“Mutiny” has appeared from the foundation of the US Military

HMS Bountyvia Daily Kos.

This is extremely disturbing. This speaks volumes of what’s going on with our troops over there in Iraq. This should never happen. From the Army Times:

“They called it an act of mutiny,” Cardenas said, still enraged that the men he considered heroes were, in his mind, slandered. “The sergeant major and the battalion commander said we were unprofessional. They said they were disappointed in us and would never forget our actions for the rest of their lives.”

But no judicial action ever came of it.

“Captain Strickland read us our rights,” DeNardi said. “We had 15 yes-or-no questions, and no matter how you answered them, it looked like you disobeyed an order. No one asked what happened. And there’s no record — no article 15. Nothing to show it happened.”

After the members of 2nd Platoon had spent a year fighting for each other and watching their buddies die, battalion leaders began breaking up the platoon. Seven noncommissioned officers were told they were being relieved for cause and moved out of the unit. Three noncommissioned officers stayed at Old Mod. Two, including Sgt. Derrick Jorcke, would remain in Iraq for one month after 2nd Platoon went home in October because they had been moved to different battalions in different areas of Iraq.

“In a way, they were put someplace where they wouldn’t have to go out again,” Johnson said. “But as an NCO, they took these guys’ leaders away and put them with people they didn’t know and trust. You knew 2nd Platoon would die for you without a second’s hesitation. That’s what made them so great. These guys need each other.”

Then, they were all flagged: No promotions. No awards. No favorable actions.

“We had PFCs miss [promotion to] specialist for two months,” DeNardi said. “Bronze Stars and [Army Commendation Medals] were put on hold. You’re talking about heroes like Cardenas. These are guys who save lives and they can’t get awards.”

“I didn’t want to punish them,” Strickland said. “I understood what was going on. But they had to understand you couldn’t do something like that and have nothing happen.”

And things could not continue as they had. Strickland could not operate for three more months with a platoon that refused to go out.

“Within the company, we made some adjustments,” Strickland said. “They needed a fresh start. After looking into it, I didn’t feel the need to punish anybody.” However, he left the flags in place.

“If anything was going to be punishment, that was it,” he said. For at least one soldier, that meant going through a promotion board again. Jorcke lost his promotion table status, but Strickland signed a memo re-establishing it. “I’ve tried to fix those issues. Almost everybody else has been promoted except one guy.” Jorcke made his E-6 on Nov. 1.

Even after the “mutiny,” Strickland said, he had a great deal of admiration for his soldiers.

“I understood why they did what they did,” he said. “Some of the NCOs, I was disappointed in them because they failed to lead their soldiers through difficult times. They let their soldiers influence their decisions. But on a personal level, I applauded their decision because they stood behind their soldiers. I was disappointed, but I thought they had great courage. It was truly a Jekyll/Hyde moment for me.”

And though they were horrified at being torn away from each other, the soldiers themselves were conflicted about the outcome.

“For us being disbanded, now we definitely had unfinished business,” Jorcke said. “If we’d cleared Adhamiya, we could have said, ‘I left Iraq and my buddies didn’t die in vain.

“But in a way, the disbanding was good,” he said. “We — what was left of the platoon — got to come back home alive.”

While the Republicans and Democrats like Senator Amy Klobuchar vote to continue to fund this war and to extend their tours of duty – more of theseFruitFly 6 stories will be leaking out.

What’s it going to take to end this war?!

Why are we still living in a country where our government refuses to listen to us?!